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FAMINES IN THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT, 1500 to 1767
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1762 (a): Multan1762 map
Documented causes: (partly?) oppressive grain duties
Documented effects: local remission of grain duties

"Punjab District Gazetteers: Multan District, Part A" (1926)
pp279-80: [From translation of an inscription dated to A.H. 1176, in the shrine of Bahawal Haqq, adjoining the Prahladpuri temple in Multan]
In the days of the Durani Emperor,
When every man's hunger was satisfied with bread,
In every place was bread cheap in price,
Nor was there famine save in Multan alone.*
No one dieth save from hunger,
And exaction of grain dues hath made high the price of food.
Now for God's sake and for the sake of the friend of God
...
Ali Muhammad Khan, the servant of God,
Hath remitted the dues upon grain

[Footnote: * "The people in the Punjab generally having apparently recovered from the great famine of A.D. 1759..."]

1762 scarcities: Punjab
Documented causes: scorched earth war: Afghans vs Sikhs
Documented effects: high prices

Hari Ram Gupta, "Studies In Later Mughal History Of The Punjab 1707 To 1793" (1944)
p192: [Punjab campaign of Ahmad Shah Durrani, 1762] "In July he set up his camp at Kalanaur in the Gurdaspur district to avoid the oppressive heat of Lahore. The Sikhs, however, gave him no peace, and he was very much annoyed at their guerilla tactics." The Sikhs created disturbances everywhere, and plundered the country. The Shah despatched his nobles in every direction to punish them ; but they did not fight with a will, and being easily defeated came back. This made the Sikhs stronger and bolder, and they began to commit depredations to the very suburbs of Lahore.' "
[Footnote: Ahmad Shah 887-8 [i.e. Ahmad Shah (of Batala), "Tarikh-i-Panjab" (in Persian, 1820)] ]. At this time Miskin travelled from Sirhind to Sialkot and back. He says that the Sikhs were growing stronger and stronger everyday, while the Afghans were laying waste the whole country, and dearness of flour prevailed everywhere, which was sold at the rate of seven seers per rupee [Source: Tahmas Khan Miskin, "Tazkira-i-Tahmas Miskin" (in Persian, 1780) pp246-7].
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